13. Anti-Taimanov with 8…Qa5+: The State of Affairs

Matthias-Wahls+A-Line-for-White-Number-2-The-Anti-Taimanov-1-e4-c5-2

In 1987 I wrote a booklet on the Anti-Taimanov Variation with 6.Bf4, which might have contained 25 pages or so. I came up with new ideas and might have inspired some of the readers to adopt 6.Bf4 in their repertoire.


[Event "Budapest"] [Site "Budapest"] [Date "1988.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Wahls"] [Black "Lau"] [Result "*"] [ECO "B44"] [WhiteElo "2440"] [BlackElo "2540"] [Annotator "Wahls"] [PlyCount "134"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventCountry "HUN"] [Source "ChessBase"]

1. e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 {Black announces that he might be willing to
play the Taimanov-Variation which arises after 5.Nc3 a6, even though he also
could opt for 5...d6 (which I did in a couple of games) or 5...Nf6 (Four
Knight Variation).} 5. Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 {Diagram [#] This was Fischer's preferred
Anti-Taimanov-weapon, which he also played in the important Candidate matches
against Petrosjan and Taimanov in 1971. More popular, however, is 6.c4.} e5 7.
Be3 Nf6 8. Bg5 {[%cal Gb5c3,Gc3d5,Yb1d2,Yd2c4] Diagram [#] The bishop
performed a funny dance which one could call a "three-step". As a consequence,
we have reached a position similar to the Shveshnikov Variation, but with a
tempo down (here, the knight is still on b1). But what might look like an act
of arrogance, is in reality an elaborate scheme. In the Shveshnikov, the
square c3 is occupied by the queen's knight, which forces the king's knight to
retreat to the uninviting location a3, after 8...a6. Here however, it coud
smoothly drop back to c3 and from there continue to his dream destination d5.
The queen's knight also has the option to occupy the square c3, after it is
vacated by his colleague, or, alternatively, to develop to d2 and, under lucky
circumstances, further to c4.} Qa5+ $5 {Diagram [#] The most important
contribution of my little work surely was the analyses of 8...Qa5+,
because this line is the only one which gives Black chances to play for an
advantage. In all the other variations, Black's task is to neutralize White's
initiative and to achieve a draw in the end, whereas here, he brings about
strong imbalances. If White had to fear a single variation, then it would
surely be this one. The more conventional alternatives are 8...Be6 and 8..a6.}
9. Qd2 ({After} 9. Bd2 Qd8 {White has nothing better than} 10. Bg5 {and if
Black keeps on insisting with} Qa5+ {White would finally have to sacrifice the
pawn, in oder to avert the draw.}) 9... Nxe4 10. Qxa5 Nxa5 11. Be3 Kd7 {
Diagram [#] The king doesn't go to d8, since there would be a nasty check on
b6, after the pawn a7 has disappeared.} 12. f3 ({In Fischer-Taimanov,
Candidate Match Vancouver 1971, there happened} 12. N1c3 Nxc3 13. Nxc3 Kd8 $6 {
, but} (13... b6 14. O-O-O Bb7 15. f4 f6 $13 {looks a lot tougher.})) 12... Nf6
13. Bxa7 $1 {Diagram [#] That is my novelty, which I had the chance to
introduce into practice myself (fortunately there haven't been that many
copies of my booklet printed, so no one took this away from me). The point
will be seen in the next move. After its inception in this game, 19 more games
have been played. This survey includes them all and represents the current
state of affairs.} (13. Nxa7 d5 14. c3 d4 15. cxd4 Nd5 $1 16. Nxc8 Kxc8 17. Bd2
Nb3 18. Bc4 Nxa1 19. Bxd5 Nc2+ 20. Kf2 Nxd4 21. Bxf7 $15 {1/2-1/2 (21) Estrin,
Y-Liberzon,V Moscow 1965}) 13... d5 14. f4 $5 {Diagram [#] For a long time I
considered this destruction of Black's proud pawn phalanx as the refutation of
9...Qa5+. However, when scrutinizing the material it became clear that the
Black players haven't been idle and came up with interesting ideas. As it
seems, one email guy even found a way to equality..... But this is no reason
to get depressed. Being White, you still have two decent options here. Option
1 is to play Korneev's move 14.Bf2, which I analyzed below. It should be good
enough for giving you an edge. Option 2 is to play my move 14.f4 and then see,
whether your opponent is really acquainted with this position and finds the
only way to equality within a jungle of traps and inferior alternatives. Note,
that even if he plays the best line, war isn't over yet. He still would have
to follow up with the correct moves for quite a while. Pick the most dangerous
line of my analyses (according to your taste) and put him to the test. Or dive
even deeper into the position by doing your own research. Thus you will have
strong practical advantage over your opponent.} (14. Bf2 Kc6 (14... Nc6 $6 15.
N1a3 (15. Nd2 $5 Nb4 (15... Ne8 16. a3 Nd6 17. Bb6 Nxb5 18. Bxb5 Bd6 19. c4 d4
20. O-O Ke7 21. Ne4 Bb8 22. f4 $36) 16. O-O-O Rxa2 (16... Nxa2+ 17. Kb1 Kc6 (
17... Nb4 $2 18. Nc4 $18) 18. Bg3 Nd7 19. f4 f6 20. Be2 Nb4 21. Rhf1 e4 22. c4
f5 23. cxd5+ Nxd5 24. Nd4+ Kc7 25. Nxf5 $16) 17. Kb1 Kc6 18. Nb3 Be6 19. g4 (
19. Re1 Nd7) 19... Ra4 20. Re1 Nd7 21. f4 Nf6 22. fxe5 Nxg4 23. Bd4 Kd7 24. Nd6
$36) 15... b6 16. O-O-O $1 (16. Bxb6 Ba6 17. Bf2 Be7 18. O-O-O Bxb5 19. Nxb5
Rxa2 20. Kb1 Rha8 $11 {Tritt,M (1896)-Heineman,C (2125) ICCF email 2008} 21. c3
Ra1+ 22. Kc2 Rxd1 23. Kxd1 Na5 24. Kc2 Kc6 25. Be2 Nc4 26. Bxc4 dxc4 27. Na7+
Kd5 28. Rd1+ Ke6 29. Re1 Kd5 30. Rd1+ Ke6 31. Re1 Kd5) 16... Bc5 (16... Bxa3
17. Nxa3 Kc7 18. Bb5 Be6 19. Rhe1 Nd7 20. Bg3 f6 21. f4 Rhe8 22. fxe5 fxe5 23.
Bd3 Rh8 24. Nb5+ Kb7 25. a3 $16) 17. Bh4 Bb7 18. Kb1 Rhd8 19. c3 Kc8 20. Nc2
$16) 15. Nd2 Be6 16. a4 $1 (16. Be2 $2 Nc4 $11) 16... Nd7 (16... Kd7 17. c3 $14
) 17. Be2 $14 {Diagram [#] White has the safer king and might expand with c3 and b4 or attack Black's center with c4 or
f4 in the appropriate moment.} Nc4 {Exchanging pieces seems to be the right idea, when you have a
vulnerable king.} 18. Nxc4 dxc4 19. O-O g5 $2 {Black wishes to prevent f4, but
without success.} (19... Bc5 20. f4) 20. f4 $1 gxf4 21. Bf3+ Bd5 22. Bxd5+ Kxd5
23. Nc7+ Kc6 24. Nxa8 Bd6 25. Nb6 Nxb6 26. Bxb6 $2 {Even though from here on, it
is theoretically irrelevant, I will present you the full game to honor
Korneev's contribution.} (26. a5 Nd5 27. a6 b6 28. a7 Ra8 29. Rfd1 e4 30. c3 $18
{e.g.} Bc7 31. Kf1 f5 32. Ra4 b5 33. Ra6+ Nb6 34. Bd4 Kb7 35. Ra5 Kc6 36. Ke2)
26... Kxb6 27. g3 Rg8 28. Rad1 Kc6 29. Kh1 Bc5 30. gxf4 e4 31. f5 e3 32. Rde1
$2 (32. Rfe1 Rg5 33. b4 cxb3 34. cxb3 Rxf5 35. b4 Bxb4 (35... Ba7 36. Rf1 $18)
36. Rxe3 $16) 32... Kd5 $13 33. Rg1 Ra8 $2 (33... Rxg1+ 34. Kxg1 Ke4 35. Kg2 h5
$11 {White is unable to put his king to e2 and activate the rook.}) 34. Rg7 $16
Rxa4 35. Rxf7 c3 36. bxc3 Rf4 37. Re2 $2 (37. Rxh7 Rf2 38. Rc7 $1 e2 39. Rxc5+
$1 Kxc5 40. Kg1 $16) 37... Ke4 38. Kg2 Rg4+ 39. Kf1 Kf3 $2 (39... Rf4+ 40. Ke1
Rg4 41. Kd1 (41. Kf1 $11) 41... Kf3 42. Re1 Kf2 43. Rxh7 Ra4 44. Re2+ Kf1 45.
Re1+ Kf2 $11) 40. Rxh7 $18 Rg1+ 41. Kxg1 Kxe2 42. Kg2 Ke1 43. Rxb7 e2 44. Rd7 {
1-0 Korneev,O (2605)-De la Riva Aguado,O (2430) Terrassa 1995}) 14... exf4 (
14... Nc6 15. fxe5 Bb4+ $1 16. N1c3 (16. c3 $6 Re8 17. cxb4 Rxe5+ 18. Be2 Nxa7
19. Nxa7 Rxa7 $13 {Wittmann,W (2400)-Hoelzl,F (2350), Bad Schallerbach 1989})
16... Nxa7 $2 (16... Ne4 17. Be3 Bxc3+ 18. bxc3 Nxe5 19. O-O-O Ng4 20. Rxd5+
Kc6 21. Rd4 Nxe3 22. Rxe4 Nxf1 23. a4 Ne3 24. Rxe3 Rxa4 25. Nd4+ $14) 17. exf6
Re8+ 18. Kd2 $16 {Rodriguez Cespedes,A (2510)-Hellsten,J (2490) , Yerevan 1996}
) (14... Bd6 15. N1c3 $1 Nc6 16. Nxd6 (16. Bf2 $1 Nb4 (16... exf4 17. O-O-O Be5
18. Nxd5 Nxd5 19. Rxd5+ Ke6 20. Bc4 Kf6 21. Nd4 Rd8 22. Rxd8 Nxd8 23. Re1 Ne6
24. Nxe6 Bxe6 25. Bh4+) 17. Nxd6 Kxd6 18. fxe5+ Kxe5 19. Bd3 Bf5 20. O-O Nxd3
21. Bg3+ Ke6 22. Nb5 $1 Kd7 23. Rxf5 Nxb2 24. Be5 $36) 16... Kxd6 17. fxe5+ (
17. Nb5+ $2 Kd7 18. fxe5 Re8 19. Bd4 (19. O-O-O Rxe5 20. Bb6 Rxa2 21. Kb1 Ra6
22. Bc7 Re4 $13) 19... Nxd4 20. Nxd4 Rxe5+ 21. Be2 Ke7 $11 {Dimitrov,V (2475)
-Stojanovic,M (2445) , Arandjelovac 1997}) 17... Kxe5 18. Bb6 d4 19. Bc7+ Kf5
20. Bd3+ Kg5 21. Nb5 Re8+ 22. Kd2 Ne4+ 23. Bxe4 Rxe4 24. a3 $14) (14... Bb4+ $5
15. c3 (15. N1c3 Bxc3+ 16. bxc3 exf4) 15... Bd6 16. Nxd6 (16. fxe5 $1 Re8 (
16... Bxe5 17. N1a3 Nc6 18. Be3 Re8 19. O-O-O Bb8 20. Bb6 Ne5 21. h3 $14) 17.
Nd2 Rxe5+ 18. Kd1 Nc6 19. Bb6 Bb8 20. Nf3 Re7 21. a4 Ne4 22. Kc2 Ke8 23. Nbd4
Nxd4+ 24. Nxd4 f6 25. g3 Kf7 26. Be2) 16... Kxd6 17. fxe5+ Kxe5 18. Bd4+ Kd6
19. Na3 (19. Bxf6 Nb3 20. Na3 Nxa1 21. Bxg7 Rg8 22. Bh6 Bf5 23. Kd2 Rxa3 24.
bxa3 Nc2 25. a4 Na3 $11) 19... Re8+ 20. Kd2 (20. Kf2 $6 Ne4+ 21. Kg1 f6 $11 {
Korneev,O (2615)-Passoni,C (2240) Valencia 1999}) 20... Ne4+ 21. Kc1 Bf5 (21...
Nc6 22. Nb5+ Kd7 23. Bd3 (23. Bb6 $2 Ra6 24. Bg1 $2 Ng3) 23... Nxd4 24. Nxd4
Kc7 25. Rf1 (25. Kc2 Bd7) 25... f6 26. a4 Nc5 27. Bc2 $14) 22. b3 Nc6 23. Nb5+
Kd7 24. a4 (24. Bb6) 24... Nxd4 25. Nxd4 Re5 26. Kb2 Kc7 27. Bd3 Bd7 28. Rhf1
f6 29. Nf3 Re7 30. Bc2 $14) (14... e4 15. Nd2 (15. N1c3 $5 Kc6 16. Bd4 Bc5 17.
h3 (17. O-O-O $6 Bg4) 17... Bxd4 (17... h5 18. Bxc5 Kxc5 19. Nc7 Rb8 20. O-O-O
d4 21. b4+ Kxb4 22. Rxd4+ Kc5 23. N7b5 Kb6 24. Na4+ Ka6 25. Nd6+ $16) 18. Nxd4+
Kb6 19. g4 Nc6 20. O-O-O Rd8 21. a3 $14) 15... Nc6 16. Bg1 Nb4 17. O-O-O $1 (
17. Nd4 $2 Bd6 $15 {Birchall,B-Coleman,P England 1992}) 17... Nxa2+ (17... Rxa2
$2 18. Kb1 Ra8 19. Nc4 $18) 18. Kb1 Kc6 19. Na7+ Rxa7 (19... Kc7 20. Nxc8 Kxc8
21. c3) 20. Bxa7 Bg4 21. Re1 b6 22. Kxa2 Bd6 23. Nb3 Bxf4 24. h3 Be6 25. Nd4+
Kb7 26. Bxb6 Kxb6 27. Be2 $14) 15. N1c3 {Diagram [#]} Bb4 (15... Nc6 $5 {
Since I was unable to win this stem game, fate gave me a second chance here.}
16. Bb6 Ra6 17. Bg1 $6 {The intention was to move the bishop far away from the
hooves of heavy horses. However, it will be needed on h4 as you can see in the
line 17.Bf2.} (17. Bc7 $6 Nb4 18. O-O-O Nxa2+ 19. Nxa2 Rxa2 20. Kb1 Ra8 21.
Bxf4 (21. Be5 Kc6 22. Bxf6 $2 gxf6 23. Rxd5 $2 Kxd5 24. Nc7+ Kc6 $19 {Svendsen,
T-Riemer,W corr 1994}) 21... Kc6 22. Nd4+ Kb6 23. Rd3 Ra4 24. Rb3+ Rb4 25. Bd3
Rxb3 26. Nxb3 Be6 27. Re1 $11) (17. Bf2 Kd8 18. Bh4 $1 (18. O-O-O Bg4 19. Re1 (
19. Nd4 Bxd1 20. Bxa6 bxa6 21. Nxc6+ Kc7 22. Ne5 Bh5 $11) 19... Be6 (19... Bb4
20. Bd3 Kd7 21. Rhf1 $14) 20. h3 Kc8 21. a3 Ra5 $11) 18... Be6 19. O-O-O Kc8
20. Kb1 Ng4 21. Nxd5 g5 22. h3 Ne3 23. Nxe3 Bxa2+ 24. Kc1 gxh4 25. Nf5 $14)
17... Kd8 (17... Bb4 $2 18. O-O-O $16 Rd8 $2 19. a3 Ba5 20. Bc5 (20. Nxd5 $142)
20... Bb6 $6 (20... Ne7) 21. Bxb6 $6 (21. Na4 $1) 21... Rxb6 22. Na4 Rxb5 23.
Bxb5 $16 {Yeo,M (2251)-Jovanovic,V (2153) Belgrade 2003}) 18. O-O-O (18. a3 Be6
19. O-O-O Kc8 $11 20. Nd4 Ra8 21. Bb5 (21. Nxe6 fxe6 22. g3 fxg3 23. hxg3 g5
24. Be3 g4) 21... Kc7 22. Be2 Be7 23. Bf3 Ne5) 18... Bg4 19. Rd2 Bb4 20. a3 (
20. h3 Bh5 21. Bc4 Re8 22. Bh2 Kc8 23. Bxd5 Ra5 24. Bxc6 bxc6 25. Nd6+ Bxd6 26.
Rxd6 Ne4 27. Rxc6+ Kb7 28. Rc4 Nxc3 29. Rxc3 g5 $11) 20... Re8 21. Bf2 Kc8 22.
h3 (22. axb4 $2 Ra1+ 23. Nb1 Ne4 $17) 22... Ne4 $4 {After treating the opening
phase extremely well, it was very unfortunate for my opponent to commit this
blunder. However, if I consider how often I was playing Santa in my chess
career, it is only fair that I am on the receiving end here.} (22... Bh5 23.
Kb1 Bxc3 24. Nxc3 Ra5 25. Bb5 Ne4 26. Rxd5 Nxf2 27. Rf1 Be2 28. Rxf2 Bxb5 29.
Rxb5 Re1+ 30. Ka2 g5 $11) 23. hxg4 Nxd2 24. Kxd2 $18 Bxc3+ 25. Kxc3 Ne5 26.
Na7+ Kc7 27. Bxa6 bxa6 28. Rxh7 Rg8 29. g5 Nc4 30. Bd4 Kb7 31. Rh4 Ne3 32. Rxf4
{1-0 (32) Wahls,M (2480)-Gik,E (2355) Berlin 1993}) 16. Bd4 Re8+ 17. Be2 {
Diagram [#]} Kc6 (17... f3 $2 18. gxf3 Nh5 $2 19. Kf2 $2 (19. O-O-O $18) 19...
Nc6 20. Nxd5 Nxd4 21. Nxd4 Bc5 {That's why 19.0-0-0 was better.} 22. Rhd1 Re5
23. c4 Ra4 $2 (23... Nf6) 24. b4 $1 $18 Rxd5 25. bxc5 Re5 26. f4 $1 Nxf4 27.
Nf3+ Ke6 28. Rd6+ Kf5 29. Nd4+ $1 {1-0 (29) Spraggett,K (2565)-Grabliauskas,V
(2465) Cappelle-la-Grande 1998}) (17... Ne4 $1 {The equalizer.} 18. O-O-O (18.
Bxg7 Kc6 $1 19. Nd4+ (19. O-O Nxc3 20. Nd4+ Kd7 21. bxc3 (21. Bg4+ Kd8 22. bxc3
Bxc3 23. Bf6+ Re7 24. Bf3 Bxa1 25. Rxa1 Nc6 26. Ne2 Be6 27. Nxf4 Kd7 28. Bxe7
Nxe7 $11) 21... Bxc3 22. Bb5+ Nc6 23. Nxc6 Bxg7 24. Ne5+ (24. Nb4+ Kd6 $1 (
24... Kd8 25. Rad1 $14) 25. Bxe8 Bd4+ 26. Kh1 Bxa1 27. Rxa1 Be6 28. Bb5 Kc5)
24... Kd6 25. Bxe8 Bxe5 26. Rab1 Bf5 27. Bxf7 Bd4+ 28. Kh1 Bxc2 29. Rxb7 Rxa2
30. Bh5 Be3 $44) 19... Kc5 20. O-O (20. Ndb5 Kc6 $11 21. a4 Nxc3 22. Bxc3 Bc5
23. h3 Nc4) 20... Bxc3 21. bxc3 Rg8 22. Be5 Bh3 23. Bf3 Rxg2+ 24. Bxg2 Rg8 25.
Rab1 Rxg2+ 26. Kh1 Rg8 (26... Nf2+ 27. Rxf2 Rxf2 28. Bc7 $18) 27. Rb5+ Kc4 28.
Rxf4 $11) (18. O-O Bxc3 19. Bxc3 g5 20. Rad1 (20. Bh5 Nxc3 21. Nxc3 d4 22. Rfd1
(22. Rad1 Nc6 23. Bxf7 Re5 24. Nd5 Rb8 25. g3 Kd6 26. Nb6 Rf5 27. Nxc8+ Rxc8
28. Bc4 Re8) 22... Nc6 23. Nb5 Re5 $11) (20. a4 Nxc3 21. Nxc3 d4 22. Rfd1 Nc6
23. Bf3 Rd8 24. Nb5 Ne5 25. Rxd4+ Ke7 $11) 20... Kc6 21. b3 (21. Bd4 Nd6 22.
Nxd6 Kxd6 23. Bd3 $13) 21... h5 $1 22. Rd4 (22. Bb2 Bg4) 22... Bg4 23. Bd3 Nxc3
24. Nxc3 Be6 25. h4 (25. Bb5+ $2 Kc5 26. Bxe8 Kxd4 27. Nb5+ Ke5 $19 28. Re1+
Kf6) 25... Kc5 (25... f6 $2 26. Bb5+ Kc5 27. Bxe8 Kxd4 28. Nb5+ Ke5 (28... Kc5
29. Nc7) 29. Re1+ Kf5 30. Nd6+ $18) 26. Ra4 Nc6 27. Rxa8 Rxa8 28. hxg5 Ne5 29.
Rxf4 Nxd3 30. cxd3 Rg8 31. b4+ Kc6 32. a4 Rxg5 33. Kf2 Rg8 $11) 18... Bxc3 19.
Bxc3 Kc6 $1 {This improvement was found in the relaxing atmosphere of a
correspondence game.} (19... Nxc3 $2 20. Nxc3 Kc7 21. Nxd5+ Kb8 22. Bb5 $16 (
22. Rhe1 $2 {Berg,K (2395)-Taimanov,M (2500) Copenhagen 1993})) 20. Bxg7 Nc4
21. Nd4+ (21. Rxd5 Kxd5 22. Nc7+ Kc6 23. Nxe8 Rxa2 24. Kb1 Ra8 25. b3 Ncd2+ 26.
Kb2 Bh3 27. gxh3 Rxe8 28. Rd1 f3 29. Bd3 Re6 30. Bd4 Rd6 31. Be3 f2 32. Bxf2
Nxf2 33. Rxd2 Nxd3+ 34. cxd3 $11) 21... Kb6 22. Bxc4 (22. Nb3 Nf2 23. Bd4+ Kc7
24. Bxf2 Rxe2 25. Rxd5 Be6 26. Rc5+ Kb8 27. Bh4 Ra4 $15) 22... dxc4 23. a3 Rg8
{1/2-1/2 (23) Goze,T (2300)-Ketola,V (2430) ICCF email 2006} 24. Rhe1 Nc3 $1
25. bxc3 Rxg7 26. Re8 (26. Kb2 Rxg2 27. Re7 Be6 28. Rf1 Rc8 $11) 26... Rxg2 27.
Rf1 Rxh2 28. Rxf4 f5 29. Kb2 Rh6 $11 {e.g.} 30. Nf3 Re6 31. Rh8 Re4 32. Rh4
Rxh4 33. Nxh4 f4 34. Rxh7 Bg4 35. Rf7 f3) 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. O-O-O {Diagram [#]}
Be6 (19... Nc4 $1 {After this, White's advantage is distinctive, but not as
big as in the game.} 20. Nd4+ (20. a3 $5 Bxc3 21. Nxc3 Re5 22. Rd4 Ne3 23. Rxf4
Nxg2 24. Rxf6+ Be6 25. Rg1 Ne3 26. Bd3 Rh5 27. Rg7 Kd6 28. Rf2 $36) 20... Kc5
$2 (20... Kd6 21. Ncb5+ Kd7 22. a3 Bc5 23. Bxc4 dxc4 24. Rhf1 Re5 25. Rxf4 Ke7
26. Rh4 $36) 21. Nb3+ Kc6 22. Nxd5 Rxe2 23. Nxb4+ Kc7 24. Nd5+ $2 (24. g3 $16)
24... Kb8 25. Nxf4 Rf2 26. Rhf1 Rxf1 27. Rxf1 Rxa2 28. Nd5 Rxb2 $2 (28... Be6
29. Nc3 Ra6 30. Rxf6 Ne3 31. Nd4 Ra1+ 32. Kd2 Ng4 33. Rf4 Rg1 34. g3 Rg2+ 35.
Nce2 Nxh2 36. Ke1 h5 37. Nxe6 fxe6 38. Rf6 e5 39. Rf5 $36) 29. Rf4 b5 30. Nc3
Be6 31. Na5 Ka7 32. Rxc4 $2 (32. Nxc4 $2 Rb4 $16) (32. Rxf6 $1 $18) 32... bxc4
33. Kxb2 Kb6 34. Ne4 (34. Nxc4+ $2 Bxc4 $14 {Gara,T (2288)-Jovanovic,V (2109)
Saint Vincent 2005}) 34... Kxa5 35. Nxf6 Kb4 (35... h6 36. Kc3 Kb5 37. Kd4 $16)
36. c3+ Kc5 37. Nxh7 $16) (19... Re5 20. Rhf1 $16 (20. Bf3 $5 Be6 21. Rd4 Kc5
22. Rhd1 Nc4 23. Rxf4 $16) 20... Bxc3 (20... Bc5 21. Nd4+ Kc7 22. Nxd5+ Kb8 23.
Nxf4 Nc6 24. c3 Rxa2 25. Kb1 Ra8 26. Nc2 $16) 21. Nxc3 Be6 22. Rxf4 Nc4 23.
Bxc4 dxc4 24. Rxf6 b5 25. a3 Rh5 26. h3 Rg8 27. Ne2 Kc5 $2 (27... Rg6 28. Rf2
Rhg5 29. Rd2 $16) 28. Nf4 Re5 29. g4 $18 b4 30. axb4+ Kxb4 31. Rd4 Ra8 32. Nd3+
Kb5 33. Nxe5 {1-0 Geenen,M (2345)-Weemaes,R (2360) Brasschaat 1990}) 20. Bf3 $2
(20. Rhf1 Bc5 21. Nd4+ Kc7 22. Rxf4 Nc6 23. Nxe6+ (23. Ncb5+ Kb6 24. a3 Ra4 25.
c3 $16) 23... fxe6 24. Rxf6 $16) (20. a3 Bc5 (20... Bxc3 21. Nxc3 Nc4 22. Rd4
$16) 21. b4 Be3+ 22. Kb2 Red8 (22... Nc4+ $2 23. Bxc4 dxc4 24. Rd6#) 23. bxa5 {
The beginning of a long forced variation.} (23. Nd4+ Bxd4 24. Rxd4 Nc4+ 25.
Bxc4 dxc4 26. Rxf4 Rd2 $14) 23... d4 24. Nb1 Rxa5 25. c4 Kc5 26. Nd2 Bxd2 27.
Rxd2 Bxc4 28. Bxc4 Kxc4 29. Nc7 d3 30. Rf2 (30. Rf1 $2 Kd4) 30... Kd4 31. Re1
f3 32. Rxf3 d2 33. Rd1 Ke4 34. Rb3 Rc5 35. Nb5 $16) 20... Rad8 $2 {Diagram [#]}(20... Nc4
$14) 21. Nd4+ $2 (21. Rd4 $1 Bc5 (21... Bxc3 22. Nxc3 Kc5 23. Rxf4 $16) 22. b4
$1 $18 {I must have overlooked this one.}) 21... Kc7 $2 {Later on,
there is a knight check on b5 in one of the variations.} (21... Kb6) 22. Nce2
$2 (22. a3 Bf8 (22... Bxc3 23. Nb5+ Kb8 24. Nxc3 Nc4 25. Rd4 Ne5 26. Rhd1 $16)
23. Rhe1 Re7 (23... Nc4 24. Nxd5+ Bxd5 25. Rxe8 Rxe8 26. Bxd5 Ne3 27. Bxf7 Re7
28. Ne6+ $16) (23... Nc6 $2 24. Nxd5+ Bxd5 25. Nb5+ Kb6 26. Rxe8 Rxe8 27. Rxd5
$16) 24. Bxd5 Bxd5 25. Ndb5+ Kc6 26. Na7+ Kc5 27. b4+ Kc4 28. Na4 Bc6 29. Nb2+
Kc3 30. Rxd8 Rxe1+ 31. Nd1+ $16) 22... Bf8 $6 (22... Nc6 $14) 23. Nxf4 Bh6 24.
Nde2 $2 {Maybe my intention was to play 25.Kb1 and then take on d5. But then,
there still would be a knight hanging on e2.} (24. g3) 24... d4 $2 (24... Nc4
25. g3 Bf5 26. Nd4 Be4 $11) 25. Kb1 Bc4 $6 (25... Nc4) 26. b3 Ba6 27. g3 $2 (
27. Nd3 Nc6 28. Nef4) 27... Re3 $2 {Diagram [#]} (27... Nc6) 28. Bg4 $2 (28.
Nxd4 Rxd4 29. Rxd4 Rxf3 30. Nd5+ Kc6 (30... Kb8 31. Rh4 Bd2 32. Rxh7 $16) 31.
Nb4+ Kb6 32. Rh4 {Probably, I didn't arrive at this position in my
calculations. But even if I did, I might have underestimated the power of the
ensuing past h-pawn or overestimated his piece play against my king.} Bd2 33.
Nd5+ Kc5 34. Rh5 Kc6 35. Nf4 Bf1 36. Rh6 Bc3 37. Rxh7 Kd6 38. h4 Nc6 39. h5 Nd4
40. Rh8 Rf2 {Certainly, this does look a it bit scary.} 41. Rc8 $1 Nb5 42. Kc1
Bd2+ 43. Kb2 Kd7 44. Rc5 Bb4 45. Rd5+ Ke8 46. Rxb5 $1 Bxb5 47. h6 Bc5 48. Kc3
Bf8 49. h7 Bg7 50. h8=Q+ Bxh8 51. Rxh8+ $16) 28... Nc6 $11 {Diagram [#] His
active pieces compensate for the bad pawn structure.} 29. Nc1 Ne5 30. Bf5 Bxf4
31. gxf4 Ng6 32. Rd2 Rd5 33. Bd3 Bxd3 34. Nxd3 Rf3 35. Re1 Nxf4 36. Re7+ Rd7
37. Rxd7+ Kxd7 38. Nxf4 Rxf4 39. c3 Kc6 40. cxd4 Kd5 41. Rg2 Kxd4 42. Rg7 Kc3
43. Rg3+ Kb4 44. Rh3 Rf1+ 45. Kb2 Rf2+ 46. Kb1 b5 47. a4 bxa4 48. bxa4 Kxa4 49.
Rxh7 Kb3 50. Kc1 Kc3 51. Kd1 Kd3 52. Ke1 Rf3 53. Rxf7 f5 54. Re7 Rh3 55. Re2 f4
56. Kf1 Rf3+ 57. Rf2 Ke3 58. Rxf3+ Kxf3 59. h4 Kg4 60. Kf2 Kxh4 61. Kf3 Kg5 62.
Kf2 Kg4 63. Kg2 f3+ 64. Kf2 Kf4 65. Kf1 Kg3 66. Kg1 f2+ 67. Kf1 Kf3 {Diagram [#] Even if
we didn't convince with quality, we surely did so with our engagement. ½-½
Wahls,M (2440)-Lau,R (2540) Budapest 1988}

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