14. Creating Imbalances with the Nimzo-Indian

[Event "Delmenhorst"] [Site "Delmenhorst"] [Date "1988.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Deze, Anton"] [Black "Wahls, Matthias"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E43"] [WhiteElo "2395"] [BlackElo "2440"] [Annotator "Wahls"] [PlyCount "74"] [EventDate "1988.??.??"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "GER"] [EventCategory "4"] [Source "ChessBase"]

{As an ambitious player you should choose openings with Black, which give you
enough potential to win against opponents of equal strength or worse. At the
same time, the opening should be solid enough and comply with the minimum
requirements of classical chess lore. In other words: You need a solid opening, where you can create imbalances.} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3.
Nc3 Bb4 $1 {Diagram [#] This moves defines the Nimzo-Indian Defense. I guess,
you never saw it in the company of an exclamation mark. And indeed, it is a
bit early in the game for such annotations. But I did it for a reason. I attached
an !"" because it is the first Nimzo-Indian of this blog and I didn't want to let this
event pass by without making a clear statement. In my opinion, 3...Bb4 is a very
strong move because it leads to positions which are at the same time solid and
yet contain enough winning potential, due to its inbuilt imbalances. In contrast
to that, the move 3...d5 is inferior, because it is solid, but doesn't contain
significant imbalances. 3...c5 on the other hand, which leads to the Modern Benoni
after 4.d5, creates extremely strong imbalances, but clearly lacks solidity. My opinion
about 3...Bb4 is also backed by solid numbers. The performance rate of the
Nimzo-Indian is an amazing 51.2%! Compare this with the meager 59,6% of 3...d5.
} 4. e3 {The Rubinstein Variation is the most popular way, to counter the
Nimzo-Indian, closely followed by 4.Qc2.} b6 {Diagram [#] The Fischer
Variation. I learned it as a 12 year old boy and remained loyal to it until
today. Black embarks on a light-square strategy by transferring his bishop to
the long diagonal, thus controlling the important square e4. I guess, what
attracted me to this line was the modern approach to control the centre with
pieces and keep the pawn powder dry for the moment, providing Black's
position with a lot of flexibility. The d- and c-pawn are
in waiting position and will spring to life, when their time has come.}
5. Bd3 Bb7 6. f3 {Diagram [#] White announces, that he is not willing to
concede the square e4. However, far more popular is} (6. Nf3 {when Black takes
possession of e4 in a physical way by jumping right into it.} Ne4 {I will
present you know the oldest game I found in the Online Database featuring 4...
b6. If you consider the date, one could questions the name "Fischer
Variation", since it was played long before Fischer even existed as a concept.
But as you can see by the player's names, 4... b6 is indeed the choice of
World Champions.} 7. Qc2 f5 {Now we have a dutch pawn structure. This is just
one of maybe 20 different structures, that could arise from the hyper-flexible
Nimzo-Indian.} 8. O-O Bxc3 9. bxc3 {Now, Black has a clear target. The pawn c4
cannot be defended anymore by his colleagues.} O-O 10. Nd2 Qh4 11. f3 (11. g3
$2 Ng5 12. gxh4 $4 Nh3# {is a nice way to win a blitz game.}) 11... Nxd2 12.
Bxd2 Nc6 13. e4 fxe4 14. Bxe4 Na5 $1 {Clearly goal orientated.} 15. Rae1 Bxe4
16. Rxe4 Qh5 17. Qa4 $2 (17. c5) 17... Nxc4 $1 $19 {Diagram [#] And there it
drops! 0-1 (39) Rabinovich,I-Alekhine,A Moscow 1920}) 6... c5 $1 {Diagram [#] By establishing direct contact with White's pawn centre, the intended
expansion 7.e4 is prevented.} 7. a3 {White has to decide whether he rather
wants to play with an isolani or doubled pawns. Not a very pleasant choice, as
you will see.} (7. Nge2 {Now 8.a3 is threatened, since White would be able to
recapture on c3 with a knight. That's why Black creates an escape route
for the bishop.} cxd4 8. exd4 O-O 9. O-O d5 10. a3 Be7 {Diagram [#] Black's
life is easy now, since he has a weak pawn to play against. White on the other
hand has problems with the location of his king's knight. In normal positions
with an isolated pawn, the knight would be on f3, ready to jump to e5 or g5.
Here however, it cannot contribute efficiently to White's attacking potential.
Additionally, the pawn on f3 is an obstacle for White's pieces. It cuts off the
route for the queen to h5 and hinders the heavy pieces from being transferred
to h3 or g3 along the third rank. Furthermore, the weakness of the square e3
might be a subject at some point.}) 7... cxd4 {Actually, Black has two good choices
here. The alternative} (7... Bxc3+ 8. bxc3 {leads to a position typical for
the Saemisch Variation (4.a3). After} Nc6 9. Ne2 O-O 10. e4 Ne8 $1 (10... Ba6
$2 11. Bg5) 11. O-O Ba6 {[%cal Gc6a5,Ga5c4,Ga8c8,Ge8d6,Gd6c4,Gc8c4,Ga6c4] Diagram [#] Black can launch the standard attack against the weak pawn on c4. Sure, since
White also has the right to move, he won't be able to do it undisturbed. But
equality is guaranteed in these kind of positions. And if White plays in
dreaming mode, there is room for more.}) 8. axb4 ({After} 8. exd4 $2 Bxc3+ $1 9.
bxc3 Ba6 $1 {Diagram [#] The weakness of the pawn on c4 makes itself felt. The only
question now is: How big is Black's advantage?} 10. Ne2 (10. Qa4 O-O 11. Ne2 d5
12. Bg5 h6 13. Bxf6 (13. Bh4 Qd7 $17) 13... Qxf6 14. Rd1 Bxc4 15. Bxc4 dxc4 16.
Qxc4 Qe7 17. a4 Nd7 $15) 10... Qc8 11. Qa4 Nc6 12. Ng3 Na5 (12... O-O 13. Bg5
Ne8 (13... Na5 14. Bxf6 gxf6 15. Nh5 f5 16. Qxd7 (16. Qc2 Qd8 $17) 16... Qxd7
17. Nf6+ Kg7 18. Nxd7 Rfc8 $15) 14. Ne4 h6 15. Bf4 Na5 16. Nc5 $1 $15) 13. Ne4
$1 Nxe4 (13... Qc7) 14. Bxe4 Bb7 15. Bxb7 Nxb7 (15... Qxb7 16. Bf4) 16. O-O O-O
17. Be3 d6 18. Rab1 Qc7 19. Rb4 Rfc8 20. Bf2 Na5 21. c5 $1 d5 $15 (21... dxc5
$2 22. dxc5 bxc5 23. Rb5)) 8... dxc3 9. bxc3 Nc6 {Diagram [#] It is logical
for the knight to head to e5 as soon as possible, but it wouldn't be a sin to
castle first, as I did in an earlier game:} (9... O-O 10. b5 $5 (10. Ne2 Nc6 {
see main game}) 10... Qc7 (10... d5 $11) (10... Re8 $5 {Keeping the tension
without letting White pursue a blocking strategy as in the line 13.Nh3 below.}
11. Ne2 (11. Ba3 $6 d5 12. cxd5 exd5) 11... Qc7 12. O-O d6 13. Ba3 Rd8) 11. Ba3
Rc8 {This is a clear improvement over a historic game, where Black overlooked
the standard trick with the discovered attack:} (11... Re8 $2 12. Bd6 $1 $16 {
1-0 (32) Weissgerber,G-Van den Bosch,J Bad Nauheim 1936}) 12. Bd6 Qd8 {Now,
the square e8 is kept free for the knight.} 13. Ne2 (13. Nh3 $5 {My opponent
could have tried to keep the d7 pawn blocked. However, there are different
methods of defence:} Ne8 14. Be2 Qh4+ $5 (14... Qf6 $6 15. Qd2 Nxd6 16. Qxd6
Qxc3+ 17. Kf2 Qf6 18. Rhd1 Qd8 19. Nf4 Qf8 20. e4 $14) (14... a6 15. O-O axb5
16. Rxa8 Bxa8 17. cxb5 Rxc3 18. Qd2 Rc8 19. Rd1 Nxd6 20. Qxd6 Qc7 21. Qxc7 Rxc7
22. Rd6 Kf8 23. e4 (23. Rxb6 $6 Bb7 24. Rd6 Ke7 25. Rd1 d5 $15) 23... Ke7 24.
Rxb6 Rc8 25. e5 f6 26. f4 Kd8) (14... Nxd6 15. Qxd6 Qf8 16. Rd1 Qxd6 17. Rxd6
Kf8 18. Kf2 Ke7 19. Rhd1 Bd5 20. cxd5 Kxd6 21. dxe6+ Ke7 (21... Kxe6 22. Nf4+
Ke7 23. Nd5+ Kd8 24. Rd4) 22. exf7 Kxf7 23. Nf4 Rxc3 24. Rd4 a6 25. Ra4 Ra7 $13
) 15. Nf2 Qg5 16. Bf4 (16. O-O Qxe3 17. Re1 Nxd6 18. Qxd6 Qc5) 16... Qe7 17.
O-O d6 $11) 13... Ne8 14. Bg3 d6 {Diagram [#] Since I have play against his
weak pawns and a nice square on c5 for my knight I would consider this position
as at least equal.} 15. O-O Nd7 16. Qb1 h6 17. Rd1 Qc7 18. Ra4 $2 {Diagram [#]}
({After} 18. Nd4 Ne5 19. Ra4 {White wards off the first onslaught and Black
has to resort to maneuvering.}) 18... Nc5 19. Rb4 Nxd3 {Removing the main
defender of White's weakness. There are moments, when chess is easy.} 20. Rxd3
a5 $1 21. Ra4 (21. bxa6 Bxa6 $17) 21... e5 $1 {[%csl Ye2,Yg3][%cal Gb7c8,Gc8e6,
Ge6c4] Diagram [#] A multipurpose move. White's minor pieces are dominated,
while my bishop receives a new avenue. The pawn c4 is under attack.} 22. e4 Rd8
23. Bf2 Bc8 24. Ng3 Be6 {White is one tempo short of transferring the knight to
e3.} 25. Nf5 Bxc4 26. Rxc4 Qxc4 27. Ne7+ Kh8 28. Nd5 Rdb8 $1 {My opponent
sacrificed the exchange to complicate matters. In situations like that, you
should always look for ways to return some material in order to get rid of the
complications while your advantage remains.} (28... a4 29. Nxb6 Qb3 30. Rd1 Ra5
31. c4 Rb8 $17) 29. Nxb6 Rxb6 30. Bxb6 a4 $19 {The a-pawn will now cause destruction.} 31. Bf2 a3 32. Rd1 {Diagram [#]} a2 $2 {Time trouble takes
its toll. 32...Qa4 wins easily.} (32... Qa4 33. Qa1 (33. b6 a2 34. Qa1 Qxd1+
$19) 33... a2 34. Re1 Qxb5 $19) 33. Qb2 Ra5 $2 {Apparently I overlooked, that
he can pick up my knight in the end and so did he. He must also have been in
time trouble.} (33... d5 $1 34. exd5 (34. b6 Nd6 35. Ra1 dxe4 36. fxe4 Kh7 $17)
34... Nd6 35. b6 Ra5 36. Ra1 Rb5 37. Qc2 Qb3 38. Qxb3 Rxb3 39. Rxa2 Rb1+ 40.
Be1 Rxe1+ 41. Kf2 Rb1 42. Ra6 g6 43. Ke3 Kg7 44. b7 (44. Kd3 Rd1+) 44... Nxb7
45. Rc6 Rb2 46. Rc7 Nd6 47. g4 Rb5 48. c4 Rb3+ 49. Ke2 Kf6 50. c5 Nb5 $19) 34.
b6 $2 (34. Ra1 Qxb5 35. Qxb5 Rxb5 36. Rxa2 Rb1+ 37. Be1 Rxe1+ 38. Kf2 Rc1 39.
Ra8 Rc2+ 40. Kf1 Rxc3 41. Rxe8+ Kh7 {and the position is drawn, even though he
has to defend against ideas such as g6 and f5 in the right moment.}) 34... Rb5
$19 35. Qa1 Qb3 36. Be1 (36. Rc1 Qb2 37. Be1 Qe2 38. Bf2 Rb2 39. Rf1 Qc2 40. h3
Rb1 $19) 36... Rxb6 37. Rd2 Qb1 $4 (37... Ra6 38. Kf1 Qb1 39. Rd1 Qxd1 $19) 38.
Rxa2 {Diagram [#] Now the game has to be won all over again. My hopes are
attached to his weak pawn and his vulnerable king (his f-pawn not being on f2
anymore makes the difference). He now should play actively, in order to bring
about exchanges. In the game, he failed to do so.} Qd3 39. Rb2 Ra6 40. Qb1 $6 (
40. Ra2 {would have let to an exchange of rooks.}) 40... Qe3+ {Since I have
the better king, I avoid the exchange of queens.} 41. Kf1 Nf6 42. Bd2 (42. Rb7)
42... Qa7 43. Qe1 $2 (43. Rb7 Qc5 44. Qd3 Ra2 45. Be3 Qa3 46. Rb1) 43... Ra1
44. Rb1 Ra2 45. Qe3 Qa4 (45... Qxe3 $5 46. Bxe3 d5 47. Rb5 dxe4 48. Rxe5 exf3
49. gxf3 Rxh2 50. c4 Rc2 51. c5 Kg8) 46. Rc1 $2 (46. Qd3) 46... Qb5+ (46... Nd7
47. c4 Nc5 $17) 47. Qe2 (47. c4 Qb2 48. Ke1 Ra3 49. Qe2 Nd7 $17) 47... Qb2 48.
Ke1 $2 (48. Rd1 Qc2 49. Kg1 d5 $17) 48... d5 $1 $19 {Diagram [#] Here we go
again!} 49. exd5 Nxd5 50. Qd3 $6 (50. g3 Nf6 51. c4 e4 $19) 50... Nf4 51. Qd8+
(51. Bxf4 Qf2+ 52. Kd1 Qg1+) 51... Kh7 52. g3 Ng2+ 53. Kd1 Qb5 54. c4 Qb3+ 55.
Ke2 Qe3+ {0-1 Vasiljevic-Wahls, Liechtenstein 1985}) 10. Ne2 Ne5 {Diagram [#] I am directing my weapons against his weak pawn. He has to play actively and
make use of my dark-squared weakness, to balance that. The position is even.}
11. O-O (11. e4 O-O (11... Qc8 12. Bf4 (12. Nd4 a6 13. Qe2 d6) 12... Nxc4 13.
Bxc4 Qxc4 14. Bd6 Ng8 $1 15. Qd4 (15. O-O Ne7 16. Qd2 Nc8 17. Rfd1 Bc6 18. Ng3
Nxd6 19. Qxd6 f6 20. Rac1 Kf7 $15) 15... Qxd4 16. Nxd4 a6 17. Kf2 Ne7 18. c4 f6
19. Nb3 Kf7 20. Rhd1 Rhc8 21. c5 bxc5 22. Nxc5 Bc6 23. Nxa6 Ra7 24. Ra5 Rca8
25. Rda1 Nc8 26. Bc5 Rb7 $11) 12. Bf4 Nxd3+ 13. Qxd3 d5 14. cxd5 exd5 15. e5
Nd7 16. O-O Re8 17. Qe3 Nxe5 18. Bxe5 Qe7 19. f4 f6 20. Qf2 fxe5 21. fxe5 Rf8
22. Qe3 Rfe8 23. Qf2 $11) (11. Nd4 O-O 12. Be2 (12. O-O {leads to the game.})
12... Qc8 (12... d5 13. cxd5 Nxd5 14. Bd2 Qh4+ 15. g3 Qh3 16. Bf1 Qh5 17. Be2
Qh3 $11) 13. Nb5 (13. Qb3 $2 d5 $15) 13... Nxc4 14. Nxa7 Qc7 15. Nb5 Qc6 16.
Nd4 Qc7 17. Nb5 $11) 11... O-O 12. Nd4 a6 ({It was also possible the release
the tension, but my style is very much geared to keep the tension against
weaker opponents and not dissolve their weaknesses.} 12... d5 13. cxd5 Nxd5 14.
Qc2 Nxd3 15. Qxd3 a5 (15... Rc8 16. Bd2 a6 $11) 16. e4 Nxb4 17. cxb4 Ba6 18.
Qd2 Bxf1 19. Kxf1 Qd6 20. Ne2 (20. bxa5 $2 Rfd8 21. Nb3 Qxh2) 20... Qxb4 21.
Qxb4 axb4 22. Rb1 Rfc8 23. Bd2 Ra2 24. Bxb4 Rcc2 25. Rc1 $11) 13. c5 $5 {
Diagram [#] The pawn moves to a square, where it is out of reach for my minor
pieces and can be defended by his bishop. Thus, it seals of the c-file.} (13.
e4 d6 (13... Qc7 $6 14. Bf4 d6 15. Nc2) (13... d5 $2 14. exd5 exd5 15. c5) (
13... Nxd3 $5 14. Qxd3 Qc7 15. c5 Rfc8 16. Nb3 d5 17. cxd6 Qxc3 18. Qxc3 Rxc3
19. Nd4 Rc4 20. Be3 Rac8 $11) 14. Be2 Rc8 (14... Qc7 15. Bg5 Nxc4 (15... Nfd7
16. Nc2 Rfc8 17. Qd2 (17. Be7 d5) 17... Nxc4 18. Bxc4 Qxc4 19. Qxd6 Qc6 20.
Rfd1 Nf8 21. Qxc6 Rxc6 22. Bd2 Rd8 $11) 16. Bxf6 gxf6 17. Qe1 Ne5 (17... Ne3
18. Qg3+ Kh8 19. Qf4 Nxf1 20. Qxf6+ Kg8 21. Qg5+ $11) 18. f4 (18. c4 Kh8 19.
Qh4 Qe7 20. Qh6 Rg8) 18... Nd7 19. Bf3 Rac8 20. Rc1 Kh8 $11) 15. Ra4 $1 Nxc4 (
15... Qc7 16. Qc2 (16. Bf4 Nxc4) (16. Nc2 Nxc4) 16... Rfe8 (16... Ra8 17. Bf4)
17. Rd1 h6 18. b5 a5 19. Nb3 Ned7 20. Be3 Rcd8 $11) 16. b5 axb5 17. Nxb5 d5 18.
Bxc4 Rxc4 19. Rxc4 dxc4 20. Ba3 Qxd1 21. Rxd1 Rb8 22. Nd6 Ba6 23. Rb1 b5 24.
Nxc4 Rc8 25. Nd6 Rxc3 26. Nxb5 $11) 13... Qc7 {Again, it was possible to
release the tension:} (13... a5 14. Be2 axb4 15. Rxa8 Qxa8 16. cxb4 bxc5 17.
bxc5 Ba6 $1 {It is important to destroy the bishop pair.} 18. e4 Bxe2 19. Qxe2
Qa4 20. Be3 Rb8 $11) (13... d6 14. c6 Bxc6 (14... Nxc6 15. Nxc6 Bxc6 16. Rxa6
Rxa6 17. Bxa6 b5 18. c4 bxc4 19. Bxc4 Qb8 20. Qd2 Bb5 21. Bxb5 Qxb5 22. Qxd6
Nd5 23. Bd2 Qe2 $11) 15. Nxc6 Nxc6 16. Rxa6 Qc7 17. Bb2 Ne5 18. Rxa8 Rxa8 19.
c4 Nxc4 20. Bxc4 Qxc4 21. Qxd6 Qe2 22. Bd4 h6 $11) 14. c4 $1 bxc5 15. bxc5 {
Diagram [#]} Rfb8 $2 {I overlooked a tactical resource, that he also
didn't spot. His bishop had to be captured immediately:} (15... Nxd3 16. Qxd3
Rfc8 (16... Rfb8 $2 {This allows his bishop a more comfortable development.}
17. Qa3 Bc6 (17... Rc8 $2 18. Rb1 Rab8 19. Bd2 Qxc5 $4 20. Qxc5 Rxc5 21. Bb4
Rcc8 22. Bd6 $18) 18. Bd2 Qe5 19. Be1 $14) 17. Ba3 Bc6 18. e4 Rcb8 (18... Qe5)
19. Bc1 a5 20. Be3 Rb7 21. Ra3 (21. Nb5 Qb8 22. Rfb1 Ne8 $11) 21... Qb8 22.
Rfa1 h6 23. Bd2 a4 {Now the game should end with a draw. It is difficult to
see, how White wants to win the pawn a4 without allowing perpetual check.} 24.
Nxc6 (24. Bc3 Qc7 25. Qd1 Rab8 26. Kh1 Ra8 27. h3 Nh5 28. Nxc6 Qxc6 29. Rxa4
Rxa4 30. Qxa4 Rb1+ 31. Kh2 Qc7+ 32. e5 Rxa1 33. Bxa1 Qxc5 34. Qxd7 (34. Qa8+
Kh7 35. Qe4+ Kg8 $11) 34... Qf2 35. Bc3 Ng3 36. Qd8+ Kh7 37. Qd3+ Kg8 38. Bd4
Nf1+ 39. Kh1 Ng3+ $11) 24... dxc6 25. Rxa4 Rxa4 26. Rxa4 Rd7 27. Qc3 Qb1+ (
27... Nh5 28. Rb4 Qd8 29. Rb2 Kh7 $11 (29... Rd3 $2 30. Rb8)) 28. Kf2 Qh1 29.
h3 Nh5 30. Ra6 Qh2 31. Rxc6 Qg3+ 32. Kf1 Qh2 33. Rc8+ Kh7 34. c6 Ng3+ 35. Kf2
Nh1+ $11) 16. Ba3 $2 ({Instead of naively defending the pawn, White could have
saved his bishop by tactical means, as indicated above:} 16. Be2 $1 Ng6 (16...
Qxc5 $2 17. Ba3 Qc7 (17... Qc8 18. Bd6 $16) 18. Nxe6 $1 dxe6 19. Bd6 Qb6 20. c5
Qc6 21. Bxe5 Rc8 22. Bxf6 gxf6 23. Ra5 $16) 17. Ba3 $14 {This position is
interesting to look at. I have the clearly better pawn structure, but all my
minor pieces are dominated by his pawns. In case of doubt, piece activity is
the more important factor. White has the edge.}) 16... Nxd3 17. Qxd3 Bc6 {
Diagram [#]} 18. Rfb1 $2 {Changing a pair of rooks should make my task easier.
It was better to play in the same spirit as shown above and double the rooks
on the a-file.} (18. e4 a5 19. Bc1 a4 20. Be3 Rb4 21. Ra3 $11) 18... h6 19. Bb2
Ne8 {I didn't like the idea that my kingside structure could be damaged by an
exchange on f6.} 20. Bc3 Rxb1+ 21. Rxb1 a5 22. Ra1 $6 (22. Nb5 Qd8 23. e4 a4
24. Bd4) 22... a4 23. Bb4 Nf6 (23... e5 $5 24. Nb5 (24. Nf5 $2 e4 $1 25. fxe4
Qe5 26. Bc3 Bxe4 27. Bxe5 Bxd3 28. Ne7+ Kh7 29. Nd5 a3 30. Nb6 Ra7 $17) 24...
Qb7 {(threatening 25...e4)} 25. e4 Nc7 26. Nxc7 {The only move because of the
shaky bishop.} Qxc7 $15 {The position is still a draw, since he can set up a
dark-squared blockade. However, he has to play with care since I could combine
pressure in the b-file with the idea of executing the lever f7-f5.}) 24. Nb5
Qe5 {Diagram [#] Here you see the reason, why White would have been better off
without exchanging one pair of rooks. My queen has more freedom due to the
many weak squares in his hinterland.} 25. Ra3 Qb2 26. Qc3 Qb1+ (26... Qe2 27.
Nd4 Qd1+ 28. Kf2) 27. Qe1 Qc2 28. Qc3 Qb1+ 29. Qe1 Qg6 30. Qd1 $2 {Diagram [#]}
({A blunder. After} 30. e4 Nh5 31. Bd2 {White's position is okay, although I
would have had several ways to unfold a certain initiative.} f5 (31... e5 32.
Nc7 (32. Qd1 f5) 32... Rc8 33. Qb1 $1 (33. Nd5 Bxd5 34. cxd5 Rxc5 35. Rxa4 Rc2
$36) 33... Nf4 34. Bxf4 exf4 35. Nd5 Qg5 36. Qb2 Re8) 32. e5 Qf7 33. Qa1 Qf8
34. Be3 Qb8 35. Rxa4 Rxa4 36. Qxa4 Qxe5) 30... h5 $2 {
The counter blunder. However, as you will see, the key to this position is hidden in a rather obscure place.} (30... Bxf3 $1 31. Qxf3 Qb1+ 32. Kf2 Rb8 33. Be1 (33. Ba5
Ne4+ 34. Ke2 Rxb5 35. cxb5 Qxb5+ 36. Kd1 f5 $1 37. Bd2 Qb2 $19) 33... Ne4+ 34.
Ke2 f5 $1 {Diagram [#] Combinations, where the climax is a "silent
move" are easily to overlook. The main threat now is 35...Rxb5 36.cxb5
Qxb5 37.Kd1 Qb1+ 38.Ke2 Qb2, picking up the rook. Another threat is 35...Qc2
36.Kf1 Qxc4 37.Qe2 Qxb5 38.Qxb5 Rxb5 39.Rxa4 Rxc5.} 35. Rc3 (35. Rd3 Qc2+ 36.
Bd2 Nxd2 37. Rxd2 Qxc4+ 38. Kf2 Qxb5 $19) 35... Rxb5 36. cxb5 Qxb5+ 37. Kd1 Qb2
38. Qf4 a3 $19) 31. Qd3 $2 {Diagram [#]} (31. Nd4) 31... Qg5 $2 {Since I was
focused on fighting on two fronts, with my a-pawn binding his forces on the
right and my other troops attacking his king on the left, I didn't pay as much
attention as I should have to lines including the exchange of queens.} (31...
Qxd3 32. Rxd3 Rb8 {Again, his shaky bishop is the one to blame.} 33. Ra3 Bxb5
34. cxb5 Rxb5 35. Rxa4 Nd5 36. Bd2 (
36. Ba3 Nxe3) 36... Rxc5 {and Black has fair winning chances due to the
presence of the minor pieces.}) 32. Nd4 (32. e4 h4 33. Qd2 Qg6 34. Nd4 (34. h3
Nh5 35. Qf2 Ng3 36. Qe1 Qh5 37. Qf2 f5 $36) 34... h3 35. Nxc6 dxc6 36. g3 Nh7
37. Kf2 Ng5 $36) 32... Bb7 (32... h4) 33. Ra1 $2 {Diagram [#] The rook should
have kept on protecting the pawn on e3.} (33. h3 e5 $2 (33... h4 $15) 34. Qf5
$1 {This motive is now not longer available.}) 33... e5 $1 34. c6 (34. h4 Qxh4
35. Nf5 e4 36. Nxh4 (36. Qb1 Qg5 $17) 36... exd3 37. Nf5 a3 38. Kf2 a2 39. Nd6
Bc6 40. e4 Nh7 41. Ke3 Nf8 42. Kxd3 $6 Ne6 43. g3 Ra4 $17) 34... dxc6 $2 {
All this looks like time trouble to me (which occurred very often in my games),
although I have no proof for that.} (34... Bxc6 35. Nxc6 dxc6 36. e4 Ne8 $17)
35. Ne2 $2 {Diagram [#] As we know, very often the player who makes the final
mistake is the one who loses in the end.} (35. h4 $1 Qxh4 36. Nf5 e4 (36... Qg5
37. e4 h4 38. Bd2 Qh5 39. Kf2) 37. Qd6 Qg5 38. Qc5 $1 Kh7 39. f4 Qg6 40. Bc3
Nd7 (40... a3 41. Ne7 Qg4 42. Bxf6 gxf6 43. Rxa3) 41. Qd4 Qf6 42. Qxf6 Nxf6 43.
Nd6 Bc8 44. Nxc8 Rxc8 45. Bxf6 gxf6 46. Rxa4 $11) 35... e4 $1 36. fxe4 c5 $1 37.
h4 Qg4 {Diagram [#] If he saves his bishop, the double attack 38...Bxe4 will
cost him his queen.} 0-1

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